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About

Assistant Professor of Developmental Biology in Neurological Surgery

Weill Cornell Medicine Pediatric Brain & Spine Center

Dr. Dahmane’s current research focuses a group of proteins called transcription factors that regulate how different genes are expressed during both brain development and brain cancer progression. Her laboratory has identified a critical novel transcription factor protein (called RP58) that is indispensable for brain development; its deletion in a mouse model leads to microcephaly, a birth defect affecting the size of the brain. New work from her group investigates how this protein may also be involved in brain tumor development.

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Weill Cornell Medicine

New York, NY, USA

scientific

Projects

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Data

Specimen

Planning

Characterizing the Blood-Brain-Barrier in Pediatric Brain Tumors

The blood brain barrier is an issue clinicians face when trying to deliver drugs for the treatment of brain cancers. Using rare samples and imaging data provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers will investigate new avenues for drug delivery.

HGG, LGG

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Mark M. Souweidane

Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY, USA
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Specimen

Ongoing

Elucidating Heterogeneity of Resistance Across Molecular Subgroups of Pediatric Ependymomas to Inform Future Therapeutics

Intracranial ependymomas are a common pediatric brain cancer with many subgroups that may respond differently to different therapies. Using cell lines provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers seek to better understand these differences in an effort to advance positive patient outcomes.

Ependymoma

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Jeffrey Greenfield

Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Deciphering the Molecular Characteristics of Pediatric Meningiomas

Pediatric meningiomas are extremely rare tumors and are often of an aggressive form unresponsive to available treatments. Specimens from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas will allow researchers to study this rare tumor in an effort to develop targeted therapies.

Medulloblastoma, HGG, LGG, Ependymoma, Meningioma, Schwannoma

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Nadia Dahmane

Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY, USA
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Specimen

Ongoing

RP58 and SMARCB1 in AT/RT Pathogenesis

Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (ATRT) is a common and aggressive pediatric tumor. Utilizing rare cell lines provided by the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers are exploring genetic alterations that could lead to more effective therapeutic strategies.

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Nadia Dahmane

Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY, USA