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About

Medical Director, Brain Tumor Institute

Children’s National Hospital

Brian R. Rood, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics in the Center for Cancer and Blood Disorders at Children’s National Hospital whose primary clinical focus is pediatric neuro-oncology. Dr. Rood joined the faculty of Children’s National in 2002 after completing a fellowship in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology as well as a research fellowship in the molecular biology of brain tumors, both at Children’s National and Children’s National Research Institute.

Dr. Rood is the Medical Director of Brain Tumor Institute at Children’s National and cares for brain tumor patients on the inpatient oncology ward and in the outpatient clinic. He is co-principal investigator with Eugene Hwang, M.D., of the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium clinical trial program at Children’s National and runs an active molecular biology and proteogenomics lab in the Center for Cancer and Immunology Research of the Children’s National Research Institute. His lab is focused on investigating the proteome of medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, in order to detect unique proteins resulting from genomic aberrations in the tumor cells. These proteins can be used as drug targets, neoantigens for T cell immunotherapies and tumor specific biomarkers that reflect the presence of residual or recurrent cancer cells. Dr. Rood also is working to identify microsatellite markers in a person’s DNA that predict the risk of developing different kinds of brain tumors.

Dr. Rood has two children. His favorite past times include designing and building furniture, sailing, reading, and playing the mandolin.

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Children’s National Hospital

Washington, DC, USA

scientific

Projects

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Specimen

Data

Planning

Proteomic Analysis of CBTN Cell Lines

Using cell lines provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers will attempt to build resources used to develop effective treatments and predict the treatment outcomes of pediatric brain tumor patients.

HGG, (AT/RT)

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Roger Reddel

The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW, Australia
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Data

Specimen

Ongoing

Children's Brain Tumor Network Pediatric Brain Tumor Proteomics Pilot

Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of disease related death in children. Major factors contributing to treatment failures for children with brain tumors include: i) the lack of comprehensive molecular description of the disease and an associated dearth of integration of the tumors’ biologi

Craniopharyngioma, Medulloblastoma, HGG, (AT/RT), LGG, Ependymoma, Ganglioglioma, DNET, Schwannoma

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Adam Resnick

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Data

Ongoing

Integrative Functional Genomics of Recurrent Childhood Medulloblastoma

Medulloblastoma relapse is unfortunately common and leaves patients with a poor prognosis. Researchers will use tumor samples and data provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network to better understand medulloblastoma relapse, how tumors evolve, and the mechanisms of metastasis in an effort to design effective therapeutic strategies.

Medulloblastoma

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Javad Nazarian

Children’s National Hospital
Washington, DC, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Comparison of CBTN Patient Data with Molecularly-Defined Stem Cell Models of Pediatric Brain Tumors

Preclinical models are a common way for researchers to study tumor types as well as test diagnostics and therapies. Researchers seek to validate their preclinical models for malignant pediatric tumors through comparison to patient-derived tumor data housed in the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas.

Medulloblastoma, HGG, DIPG, Choroid Plexus Tumors

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Data

Specimen

Ongoing

Proteogenomic Identification of Structural Variations

Changes to DNA that can give rise to cancers often create fusion proteins, proteins that may be useful as therapeutic targets. Using data from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers will analyze for the presence of such proteins in an effort to advance treatment options for pediatric brain cancers.

Medulloblastoma, DIPG

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Brian Rood

Children’s National Hospital
Washington, DC, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Germline and Somatic Microsatellite Genotypes in Pediatric Brain Tumors

Studies have shown a link between microsatellites, repeating units of DNA, and the development of several cancer types. Researchers will access the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas in an effort to identify the location of microsatellites and deepen the understanding of their connection to cancer development across brain tumor types.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Brian Rood

Children’s National Hospital
Washington, DC, USA

related

Publications

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Cell

Integrated Proteogenomic Characterization across Major Histological Types of Pediatric Brain Cancer

We report a comprehensive proteogenomics analysis, including whole-genome sequencing, RNA sequencing, and proteomics and phosphoproteomics profiling, of 218 tumors across 7 histological types of childhood brain cancer: low-grade glioma (n = 93), ependymoma (32), high-grade glioma (25), medulloblasto

Francesca Petralia, Nicole Tignor, Boris Reva, Mateusz Koptyra, Shrabanti Chowdhury, Dmitry Rykunov, Azra Krek, Weiping Ma, Yuankun Zhu, Jiayi Ji, Anna Calinawan, Jeffrey R. Whiteaker, Antonio Colaprico, Vasileios Stathias, Tatiana Omelchenko, Xiaoyu Song, Pichai Raman, Yiran Guo, Miguel A. Brown, Richard G. Ivey, John Szpyt, Sanjukta Guha Thakurta, Marina A. Gritsenko, Karl K. Weitz, Gonzalo Lopez, Selim Kalayci, Zeynep H. Gümüş, Seungyeul Yoo, Felipe da Veiga Leprevost, Hui-Yin Chang, Karsten Krug, Lizabeth Katsnelson, Ying Wang, Jacob J. Kennedy, Uliana J. Voytovich, Lei Zhao, Krutika S. Gaonkar, Brian M. Ennis, Bo Zhang, Valerie Baubet, Lamiya Tauhid, Jena V. Lilly, Jennifer L. Mason, Bailey Farrow, Nathan Young, Sarah Leary, Jamie Moon, Vladislav A. Petyuk, Javad Nazarian, Nithin D. Adappa, James N. Palmer, Robert M. Lober, Samuel Rivero-Hinojosa, Liang-Bo Wang, Joshua M. Wang, Matilda Broberg, Rosalie K. Chu, Ronald J. Moore, Matthew E. Monroe, Rui Zhao, Richard D. Smith, Jun Zhu, Ana I. Robles, Mehdi Mesri, Emily Boja, Tara Hiltke, Henry Rodriguez, Bing Zhang, Eric E. Schadt, D.R. Mani, Li Ding, Antonio Lavarone, Maciej Wiznerowicz, Stephan Schürer, Xi S. Chen, Allison P. Heath, Jo Lynne Rokita, Alexey I. Nesvizhskii, David Fenyö, Karin D. Rodland, Tao Liu, Steven P. Gygi, Amanda G. Paulovich, Adam C. Resnick, Phillip B. Storm, Brian R. Rood, Pei Wang, Children’s Brain Tumor Network, Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium