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About

Director

Center for Data Driven Discovery in Biomedicine

Adam Resnick is the Director of Data Driven Discovery in Biomedicine (D3b) at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) responsible for leading a multidisciplinary team to build and support a scalable, patient-focused healthcare and educational discovery ecosystem on behalf of all children. He is also responsible for all scientific and fiscal responsibility for projects within the Center including: center leadership, supervision of bioinformatics, genomics, visualization tools and software development for the data resource portal shared by various center initiatives.

Adam’s research is focused on defining the cell signaling mechanisms of oncogenesis and tumor progression in brain tumors. His research lab studies cell signaling cascades and their alterations in pediatric brain tumors to elucidate the molecular and genetic underpinnings of each tumor in an effort to identify and develop targeted therapies. Adam serves as Scientific Chair for several consortia-based efforts, including the Children’s Brain Tumor Tissue Consortium (CBTTC) and Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium (PNOC), which include more than 20 pediatric hospitals across the globe.

Adam earned a dual-bachelor’s in neuroscience and English & literature from the University of Florida before completing a PhD in neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD.

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Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PA, USA

scientific

Projects

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Specimen

Ongoing

Gene Expression Analysis Platform Evaluation for FFPE Specimen Material-Based Studies

Newly developed technology is advancing the ability of researchers to gain important insight from small clinical specimens.

Medulloblastoma, HGG

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Mateusz Koptyra

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Data

Planning

Proteomic Analysis of CBTN Cell Lines

Using cell lines provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers will attempt to build resources used to develop effective treatments and predict the treatment outcomes of pediatric brain tumor patients.

HGG, (AT/RT)

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Roger Reddel

The University of Sydney
Sydney, NSW, Australia
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Specimen

Ongoing

Targeting Medulloblastoma by Regulating RNA Binding Proteins

RNA-binding proteins (RBP) may play critical roles in medulloblastoma development studying their roles will provide additional direct and indirect targets for the treatment of these tumors and beyond. Researchers will utilize cell lines provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network in an effort to identify new targets in the pediatric forms of these tumors.

Medulloblastoma

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Robert Schnepp

Emory University
Atlanta, GA, USA
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Data

Specimen

Completed

Evaluation of Immunosignature Profile in Medulloblastoma

Medulloblastoma is a tumor with many subtypes and noninvasive diagnostic tools are needed to accelerate diagnosis. Using rare samples made available through the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers will analyze the use of noninvasive methods for tumor classification.

Medulloblastoma

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Mateusz Koptyra

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Ongoing

Pediatric Brain Tumor miRNA Profiling for the Cohort of Children’s Brain Tumor Network Specimens

Many pediatric brain tumors are unable to be removed in surgery, requiring the development of new effective therapies. Using RNA samples provided by CBTN, researchers are producing important characterization of the tumors and biomarker data to be used by researchers around the world in the pursuit of such new approaches.

Craniopharyngioma, Medulloblastoma, HGG, (AT/RT), LGG, Ependymoma, Ganglioglioma, DNET, Schwannoma

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Mateusz Koptyra

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Integrative Analysis of Childhood Cancers

Integrative research is needed to advance the treatment options for pediatric cancers. Researchers will analyze data provided through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas in an effort to identify new opportunities in the treatment of pediatric cancers.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Charlie Vaske

NantOmics
Culver City, California
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Data

Ongoing

Defining the Mutational Landscape of Pediatric Brain Tumors

Information regarding the mutations of genes in pediatric brain tumors is integral in developing new diagnostics and treatments. Researchers will use the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas to analyze comprehensive genetic information across pediatric brain tumor types, which will be used by researchers in the development of new treatments.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Sharon J. Diskin

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Deciphering the Molecular Characteristics of Pediatric Meningiomas

Pediatric meningiomas are extremely rare tumors and are often of an aggressive form unresponsive to available treatments. Specimens from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas will allow researchers to study this rare tumor in an effort to develop targeted therapies.

Medulloblastoma, HGG, LGG, Ependymoma, Meningioma, Schwannoma

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Nadia Dahmane

Weill Cornell Medicine
New York, NY, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Hudson Monash Paediatric Precision Medicine Program

There is a great need to find new targets for pediatric brain cancer therapeutics, requiring comprehensive analysis of tumor types. Access to the unique dataset available through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas and computational support from CBTN will allow researchers to carry out this research.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Ron Firestein

Hudson Institute of Medical Research
Clayton, Australia
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Specimen

Ongoing

CBTN Cell Lines High-Throughput Drug Screening Study (NCATS)

A robust resource on the drug response across pediatric cancer types will be helpful to guide clinical decisions. Using samples provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers will create and share this important data resource.

(AT/RT)

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Mateusz Koptyra

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Completed

Target Identification and Modeling of NF1-associated Low-grade Glioma

Low grade gliomas are often associated with the genetic disorder neurofibromatosis type 1 and research is needed to develop targeted therapies for such tumors. The Children’s Brain Tumor Network is providing researchers with rare samples necessary to accelerate progress in the treatment of NF1-LGGs.

LGG

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Michael J. Fisher

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Data

Ongoing

PNOC and SJCRH Collaborative DIPG Radiogenomic Investigation

Tumor classification through imaging is an important part of pediatric cancer diagnosis and treatment. Researchers will investigate tumor imagery and genomic data provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network in an effort to advance the accuracy of tumor classification.

DIPG

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Data

Ongoing

Cancer Stemness of Pediatric Tumors

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) derived stem cells and cancer cells share certain common characteristics. Using data from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers will perform a variety of comprehensive analyses in an effort to better understand the link between the EMT and cancer growth.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Data

Ongoing

The Australian Bioinformatics Commons Paediatric Cancer Pathfinder Project

The treatment of rare and deadly pediatric brain cancer requires an international effort to increase the impact of new discoveries. Through incorporation of data from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers seek to develop the Australian Bioinformatics Commons, the largest data sharing initiative ever undertaken in Australia.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Data

Ongoing

Decoding the Dark Matter of the High-Risk Paediatric Cancer Genome

Precision oncology can be a challenge for pediatric brain tumors. Researchers will interrogate data from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas in an effort to explain poor outcomes and guide treatments for patients with under-explored mutations.

All Brain Tumor Types, (MPNSTs)

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Data

Ongoing

Developing Summative Measures of Paediatric Cancer Risk

DNA damage susceptibility in adults has been found to be strongly associated with future cancer diagnosis, could the same be true for pediatric patients? Researchers will investigate data from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas using newly developed algorithms in an effort to answer that question.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Data

Ongoing

iPC EU Horizon 2020 - Individualized Paediatric Cure: Cloud-based Virtual-patient Models for Precision Paediatric Oncology

Medical imagery is an important part of cancer diagnostics and treatment. Researchers will use medical imagery available through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas to evaluate new anomaly detection methods in an effort to advance individualized cancer diagnostics.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Data

Ongoing

Mechanistic Modeling of High-grade Glioma

Comprehensive, integrative research is needed to advance the diagnosis and care of patients with high grade glioma (HGG). Using data provided through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers will search for potential drug targets for the treatment of HGGs.

HGG

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Data

Ongoing

Sex-specific Gene Expression Signatures in Pediatric Brain Tumors

Human development, disease risk, and response to treatments are often different in males and females. Researchers will interrogate data available through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas to determine whether cancer treatments could be optimized based on such differences.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Joshua B. Rubin

St. Louis Children's Hospital
St. Louis, Missouri, USA
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Data

Ongoing

Genetic Architecture of Molecular Phenotypes in Pediatric Brain Cancers

The identification of germline protein expression in brain cancer cells is pivotal in guiding the development of new treatments.s. Using the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers seek to create an important resource on the details of protein expression across many individual brain cancer types.

All Brain Tumor Types

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Sebastian Waszak

University of Oslo
Oslo, Norway
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Data

Planning

The landscape of pediatric RTK-driven gliomas

Oncogenic fusions involving receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) provide an excellent opportunity for therapeutic targeting but the clinical and molecular landscape of pediatric RTK-driven gliomas remains largely uncharted. To define clinically-relevant tumor subgroups and assess their prognostic significance, we will evaluate the correlation between molecular and clinical characteristics. This project will provide mechanistic insights into RTK-fused gliomas and enable precision medicine approaches to treat these tumors.

HGG, LGG

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Ana Guerreiro Stücklin

University Children's Hospital Zürich
Zürich, Switzerland
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Data

Ongoing

Leveraging existing pediatric low-grade tumor specimens, clinical and imaging outcome data and artificial intelligence innovations to develop integrated biomarkers of response for children with low-grade glioma

This study will utilize artificial intelligence algorithms to predict underlying mutational status and outcomes for pediatric low grade glioma based on complex brain tumor MRI imaging features.

LGG

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Benjamin H. Kann

Harvard Medical School
Boston, MA
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Specimen

Ongoing

Functional Dependency Mapping in Paediatric Brain Cancers

The treatment of pediatric high grade gliomas could be improved and enhanced with a deeper understanding of their genetic and molecular characteristics. Using specimens from the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers are exploring new therapeutic opportunities for pHGG.

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Ron Firestein

Hudson Institute of Medical Research
Clayton, Australia
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Specimen

Completed

Neurocytoma WGS and RNAseq

The effective treatment of brain tumors requires a robust understanding of their biology. Using rare, high quality neurocytoma samples provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Network, researchers seek to develop new treatments for this disease.

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Adam Resnick

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Ongoing

Genomic Analysis of Oligodendrogilomas Across the Pediatrics, Adolescents and Adults

Oligodendroglioma is a rare brain cancer that has been hard to study due to a lack of available biospecimens. The Children’s Brain Tumor Network will provide researchers with the rare specimens necessary to generate deeper understanding of this malignant tumor.

Oligodendroglioma

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Adam Resnick

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Ongoing

Project Hope: High-Grade Glioma-Omics in Pediatric and AYA

High grade gliomas can affect patients of all ages, and cross-age group analysis could lead to advancements in care for all populations. Using samples and data provided by the Children’s Brain Tumor Atlas, researchers supported by the NCI seek to improve outcomes for patients experiencing these tumors.

HGG

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Adam Resnick

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Data

Specimen

Ongoing

Children's Brain Tumor Network Pediatric Brain Tumor Proteomics Pilot

Pediatric brain tumors are the leading cause of disease related death in children. Major factors contributing to treatment failures for children with brain tumors include: i) the lack of comprehensive molecular description of the disease and an associated dearth of integration of the tumors’ biologi

Craniopharyngioma, Medulloblastoma, HGG, (AT/RT), LGG, Ependymoma, Ganglioglioma, DNET, Schwannoma

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Adam Resnick

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA
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Specimen

Completed

Whole Genome Sequencing and RNA Sequencing of the CBTN Bank for the Pediatric Brain Tumor Atlas

Research into adult cancer has benefited greatly from large scale genomic research. Until now due to the limited resources and availability pediatric brain tumors have not been part of large-scale genomic generation efforts. The CBTN aims to create a comprehensive genomic atlas for use by researchers worldwide to unlock how brain tumors develop, grow, survive, and how they can be treated and cured.

Craniopharyngioma, Medulloblastoma, HGG, (AT/RT), LGG, Ependymoma, Ganglioglioma, DNET, Choroid Plexus Tumors, Meningioma, DIPG, Oligodendroglioma, Schwannoma, Germinoma, Choroid Plexus Tumors, Subependymal Giant cell Astrocytoma, NGGCTs

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Adam Resnick

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA, USA

related

Publications

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Cancer Cell

Proteogenomic and Metabolomic Characterization of Human Glioblastoma

Utilizing genomic data provided by CBTN, researchers deepen their molecular understanding of GBM which could lead to more effective treatments for glioblastoma patients.

Liang-BoWang, Alla Karpova, Marina A. Gritsenko, Jennifer E. Kyle, Song Cao, Yize Li, DmitryRykunov, Antonio Colaprico, Joseph H. Rothstein, Runyu Hong, Vasileios Stathias, MacIntoshCornwell, Francesca Petralia, Yige Wu, Boris Reva, Karsten Krug, Pietro Pugliese, Emily Kawaler, Lindsey K.Olsen, Wen-Wei Liang, Xiaoyu Song, Yongchao Dou, Michael C. Wendl, Wagma Caravan, Wenke Liu, Daniel Cui Zhou, Jiayi Ji, Chia-Feng Tsai, Vladislav A. Petyuk, Jamie Moon, Weiping Ma, Rosalie K. Chu, Karl K. Weitz, Ronald J.Moore, Matthew E. Monroe, Rui Zhao, Xiaolu Yang, Seungyeul Yoo, Azra Krek, Alexis Demopoulos, Houxiang Zhu, Matthew A. Wyczalkowski, Joshua F. McMichael, Brittany L. Henderson, Caleb M. Lindgren, Hannah Boekweg, Shuangjia Lu, Jessika Baral, Lijun Yao, Kelly G. Stratton, Lisa M. Bramer, Erika Zink, Sneha P. Couvillion, Kent J. Bloodsworth, Shankha Satpathy, Weiva Sieh, Simina M. Boca, Stephan Schürer, Feng Chen, Maciej Wiznerowicz, Karen A. Ketchum, Emily S. Boja, Christopher R. Kinsinger, Ana I. Robles, Tara Hiltke, Mathangi Thiagarajan, Alexey I. Nesvizhskii, Bing Zhang, D. R. Mani, Michele Ceccarelli, Xi S. Chen, Sandra L.Cottingham34Qing KayLi35Albert H.Kim36DavidFenyö, Kelly V. Ruggles, Henry Rodriguez, Mehdi Mesri, Samuel H. Payne, Adam C. Resnick, Pei Wang, Richard D. Smith, Antonio Iavarone, Milan G. Chheda, Jill S. Barnholtz-Sloan, Karin D. Rodland, Tao Liu, Li Ding, Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium Anupriya Agarwal, Mitual Amin, Eunkyung An, Matthew L.Anderson, David W.Andrews, Thomas Bauer, Chet Birger, Michael J.Birrer, Lili Blumenberg, William E.Bocik, Uma Borate, Melissa Borucki, Meghan C.Burke, Shuang Cai, Anna P.Calinawan, Steven A.Carr, Sandra Cerda, Daniel W.Chan, Alyssa Charamut, Lin S.Chen, David Chesla, Arul M.Chinnaiyan, ShrabantiChowdhury, Marcin P.Cieślik, David J.Clark, HoustonCulpepper, TomaszCzernicki, FulvioD'Angelo, JacobDay, Stephanie De Young, EmekDemir, Saravana Mohan, Dhanasekaran, Rajiv Dhir, Marcin J.Domagalski, BrianDruker, ElizabethDuffy, MaureenDyer, Nathan J.Edwards, RobertEdwards, KimberlyElburn, Matthew J.Ellis, JenniferEschbacher, AliciaFrancis, Stacey Gabriel, Nikolay Gabrovski, Luciano Garofano, Gad Getz, Michael A.Gillette, Andrew K.Godwin, Denis Golbin, Ziad Hanhan, Linda I.Hannick, Pushpa Hariharan, Barbara Hindenach, Katherine A.Hoadley, Galen Hostetter, Chen Huang, Eric Jaehnig, Scott D.Jewell, Nan Ji, Corbin D.Jones, Alcida Karz, Wojciech Kaspera, Lyndon Kim, Ramani B.Kothadia, Chandan Kumar-Sinha, Jonathan Lei, Felipe D.Leprevost, KaiLi, Yuxing Liao, Jena Lilly, Hongwei Liu, Jan Lubínski, Rashna Madan, William Maggio, Ewa Malc, Anna Malovannaya, Sailaja Mareedu, Sanford P.Markey, AnnetteMarrero-Oliveras, NinaMartinez, Nicollette Maunganidze, Jason E.McDermott, Peter B.McGarvey, John McGee, Piotr Mieczkowski, Simona Migliozzi, Francesmary Modugno, Rebecca Montgomery, Chelsea J.Newton, Gilbert S.Omenn, UmutOzbek, Oxana V.Paklina, Amanda G.Paulovich, Amy M.Perou, Alexander R.Pico, Paul D.Piehowski, Dimitris G.Placantonakis, LarisaPolonskaya, Olga Potapova, BarbaraPruetz, Liqun Qi, Shakti Ramkissoon, Adam Resnick, Shannon Richey, Gregory Riggins, Karna Robinson, Nancy Roche, Daniel C.Rohrer, Brian R.Rood, Larissa Rossell, Sara R.Savage, Eric E.Schadt, Yan Shi, Zhiao Shi, Yvonne Shutack, Shilpi Singh, Tara Skelly, Lori J.Sokoll, Jakub Stawicki, Stephen E.Stein, James Suh, Wojciech Szopa, Dave Tabor, Donghui Tan, Darlene Tansil, Ratna R.Thangudu, Cristina Tognon, Elie Traer, Shirley Tsang, Jeffrey Tyner, Ki SungUm, Dana R.Valley, Suhas Vasaikar, Negin Vatanian, Uma Velvulou, Michael Vernon, Weiqing Wan, Junmei Wang, Alex Webster, Bo Wen, Jeffrey R.Whiteaker, George D.Wilson, Yuriy Zakhartsev, Robert Zelt, Hui Zhang, Liwei Zhang, Zhen Zhang, Grace Zhao, Jun Zhu

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